Property:Has description of origin, manner, or change of usage

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[The suffix "-ism"] is one of the most prolific word-creating elements in the [English] language. Beyond the 2,000 or more that are recorded in large dictionaries, many others are formed as need arises, often for a single use.  +, [A]ny movement that thinks and acts in terms of an ’ism becomes so involved in reaction against other ’isms that it is unwittingly controlled by them. For it then forms its principles by reaction against them instead of by a comprehensive, constructive survey of actual needs, problems, and possibilities.  +
[The suffix "-ism"] is one of the most prolific word-creating elements in the [English] language. Beyond the 2,000 or more that are recorded in large dictionaries, many others are formed as need arises, often for a single use.  +, [A]ny movement that thinks and acts in terms of an ’ism becomes so involved in reaction against other ’isms that it is unwittingly controlled by them. For it then forms its principles by reaction against them instead of by a comprehensive, constructive survey of actual needs, problems, and possibilities.  +
The Latin and French endings were originally added to verbs. Two words based on Latin verbs are '''''ornament''''' (Latin ''ornare'', adorn) and '''''testament ''''' (Latin ''testamentum'', a will, from ''testari'', to testify). Two based on French verbs are '''''appeasement''''' (Old French ''apaisier'', from ''pais'', peace), and '''''encouragement''''' (French ''encourager'' based on ''corage'', courage). English has usually followed suit by adding the ending to verbs. Many nouns ending in '''-ment''' indicate either the result of an action or the process involved.  +
The ending principally appears in words that describe kinds of words. ... Abstract nouns for the state or concept are formed in '''-onymy''': '''''homonymy''''', '''''metonymy''''', '''''toponymy'''''. Adjectives are formed in '''-onymic''' or '''-onymous''', sometimes both, though the former is rather more common ('''''eponymous''''', '''''metonymic''''', '''''synonymous''''', '''''toponymic''''').  +
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Used from the 15th to the 18th century.  +
In a number of languages the process of acquittal takes the form of a direct statement, for example, 'to say, You are not guilty' or '. . ., You no longer have sin' or, as expressed idiomatically in some instances, ' . . ., Sin is no longer on your head' or . . ., Your sins are now given back to you.'  +, At the end of a criminal trial, a finding by a judge or jury that a defendant is not guilty. An acquittal signifies that a prosecutor failed to prove his or her case beyond a reasonable doubt, not that a defendant is innocent. Thus, a person may be acquitted of a crime but found civilly liable in a civil case regarding that same crime, e.g. O.J. Simpson, because civil cases have a lower burden of proof than criminal cases.  +
In a number of languages the process of acquittal takes the form of a direct statement, for example, 'to say, You are not guilty' or '. . ., You no longer have sin' or, as expressed idiomatically in some instances, ' . . ., Sin is no longer on your head' or . . ., Your sins are now given back to you.'  +, At the end of a criminal trial, a finding by a judge or jury that a defendant is not guilty. An acquittal signifies that a prosecutor failed to prove his or her case beyond a reasonable doubt, not that a defendant is innocent. Thus, a person may be acquitted of a crime but found civilly liable in a civil case regarding that same crime, e.g. O.J. Simpson, because civil cases have a lower burden of proof than criminal cases.  +
“Act” is used to refer to a bill or joint resolution that has passed both the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate and has been signed into law by the President, or passed over his veto, thus becoming a law.  +, A law enacted by a parliament or similar legislative body. In the UK, Acts may be made by the UK Parliament, the Scottish Parliament, the National Assembly for Wales, or the Northern Ireland Assembly. Historically, Acts were also made by the parliaments that met before the UK came into existence and by the Parliament of Northern Ireland (1921 to 1972).  +
At common law, an overwhelming event caused exclusively by natural forces whose effects could not possibly be prevented (e.g., flood, earthquake, tornado). In modern jurisdictions, "act of God" is often broadened by statute to include all natural phenomena whose effects could not be prevented by the exercise of reasonable care and foresight.  +
"For this lawsuit." Comes from Latin. A guardian ad litem is a person who helps another person during a lawsuit.  +
Often distinguished from substantive law, which sets out rights and wrongs, adjective law supports substantive law. Adjective law, for which most modern jurists now prefer the term procedural law, includes those parts of the law which are concerned with the enforcement of the law and the process of seeking relevant relief from a court.  +
Often distinguished from substantive law, which sets out rights and wrongs, adjective law supports substantive law. Adjective law, for which most modern jurists now prefer the term procedural law, includes those parts of the law which are concerned with the enforcement of the law and the process of seeking relevant relief from a court.  +
To be a good executive or manager requires intelligence, definiteness, will power, determination, imagination, organizational ability, persistence -- in fact, almost any positive trait can be an asset to an administrator.  +
A court that exercises jurisdiction over all maritime contracts, torts, injuries, or offenses. The federal courts are so called when exercising their admiralty jurisdiction, which is conferred by the U.S. Constitution.  +
The founders broadly agreed that the federal courts would exercise admiralty jurisdiction, since maritime suits often involved questions of national importance that implicated commerce, international relations, and the rights of foreign citizens. The exercise of admiralty jurisdiction by the federal judiciary represented an important transfer of authority from state to federal courts, which functioned according to unique procedures and laws rooted in federal statutes, ancient civil codes, and international custom.  +
The system of trial practice in the United States and some other countries in which each of the opposing (or "adversary") parties has the opportunity to present and establish opposing positions before the court.  +
The system of trial practice in the United States and some other countries in which each of the opposing (or "adversary") parties has the opportunity to present and establish opposing positions before the court.  +
Advisory opinions are issued especially by administrative agencies and by some state courts. Federal courts are constrained by the U.S. Constitution to deciding only cases or controversies and cannot issue advisory opinions.  +
Advisory opinions are issued especially by administrative agencies and by some state courts. Federal courts are constrained by the U.S. Constitution to deciding only cases or controversies and cannot issue advisory opinions.  +
There are various kinds of affix, named according to their position in relation to the base to which they attach. The most common are prefix, attached before the base, suffix, attached after the base, and infix, attached inside a base. Several other types have been recognized at various times in the history of morphology.  +, Examples of affixation may be found before the root (a prefix), in the middle of a root (an infix), and after a root (a suffix). English has many prefixes (''de-'', ''un-'', ''pre-'') and suffixes (''-ed'', ''-tion'', ''-ly''), and infixes (inserted within the root) can be found in Latin, Arabic, and many other languages. Languages which express grammatical relationships primarily through the use of affixes are known as affixing languages (e.g. Bantu languages).  +
Has type"Has type" is a predefined property that describes the datatype of a property and is provided by Semantic MediaWiki.