Globalization (English, noun)

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Term or phrase globalization
Language English
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Function in sentence or vocabulary noun
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Alternative spelling globalisation
Dialects or regional variations
Sources of information in print
Sources of information online "British & World English: Globalization," Oxforddictionaries.com, accessed June 5, 2016, http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/globalization
Description of origin, manner, or change of usage Globalization is primarily a post-World War II development. The term “globalization” emerged sometime during the 1950s and gained widespread currency thereafter. Once in existence, it could then be applied to the history of the world before World War II. Of course, in one sense, globalization is very old. Prehistoric man roamed across the Earth. It is as if we suddenly realized, like Moliere’s bourgeois gentilhomme, that we were speaking prose all along. But the globalization I’m thinking about here is different. After World War II, with the coming and spread of computers and satellites, the interconnectivity and interdependency of Homo sapiens was unparalleled. Time and space were compressed in unprecedented ways.
Is the text of the description a quotation or a paraphrase of the source? quotation
Was the source of the description in print? If so, insert the source here. Mazlish, Bruce, “Ruptures in History,” Historically Speaking, Vol. 12, No. 3 (June 2011), 32
Or was the source of the description online? If so, insert the source here.
Century CE or BCE of origin, manner, or change of usage 20 CE
Years CE or BCE of relevance 1950 CE
Geographic area
Related languages
Related terms and phrases emerge, widespread, currency, existence, apply, history, world, prehistoric, man, earth, bourgeois, gentilhomme, bourgeois gentilhomme, prose, spread, computer, satellite, interconnectivity, interdependency, homo sapien, un-, parallel, unparalleled, time, space, compress, unprecendented
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Description of origin, manner, or change of usage In common parlance, the term ["globalisation"] creates assumptions about the desirability of increased efficiency in processes of global communication. We immediately think of easier travel, homogenisation of trade laws and hamonisation or integration of all kinds of rules, easing communication processes by recourse to one language, one pattern of doing business, and so on. This is matched by the tempting assumption that there would be less conflict if only all humans thought alike, followed uniform moral standards and respected universal human rights.

However, is this realistic in view of universal plurality? Much universalised thinking about globalisation goes too far in its uncritical acceptance of the advantages of uniformisation. It is rather unreal to expect that the whole world would ever follow one rule system, one language and culture, or one law.

Is the text of the description a quotation or a paraphrase of the source? quotation
Was the source of the description in print? If so, insert the source here. Menski, Werner, Comparative Law in a Global Context: The Legal Systems of Asia and Africa, 2nd ed. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009), 3
Or was the source of the description online? If so, insert the source here.
Century CE or BCE of origin, manner, or change of usage 21 CE
Years CE or BCE of relevance
Geographic area
Related languages
Related terms and phrases common, parlance, common parlance, term, assumption, desirable, desirability, efficiency, process, global, communication, travel, homogenize, homogenization, harmonize, harmonization, integrate, integration, recourse, pattern, business, match, tempt, assumption, conflict, uniform, moral, standard, human, right, moral, standard, human rights, plurality, universal, uniformization, rule, language, culture, law
Related symbols, icons, designs, and works of art
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Description of origin, manner, or change of usage Globalization 1.0 (1492 to 1800) shrank the world from a size large to a size medium, and the dynamic force in that era was countries globalizing for resources and imperial conquest. Globalization 2.0 (1800 to 2000) shrank the world from a size medium to a size small, and it was spearheaded by companies globalizing for markets and labor. Globalization 3.0 (which started around 2000) is shrinking the world from a size small to a size tiny and flattening the playing field at the same time. And while the dynamic force in Globalization 1.0 was countries globalizing and the dynamic force in Globalization 2.0 was companies globalizing, the dynamic force in Globalization 3.0 — the thing that gives it its unique character — is individuals and small groups globalizing. Individuals must, and can, now ask: where do I fit into the global competition and opportunities of the day, and how can I, on my own, collaborate with others globally? But Globalization 3.0 not only differs from the previous eras in how it is shrinking and flattening the world and in how it is empowering individuals. It is also different in that Globalization 1.0 and 2.0 were driven primarily by European and American companies and countries. But going forward, this will be less and less true. Globalization 3.0 is not only going to be driven more by individuals but also by a much more diverse — non-Western, nonwhite — group of individuals. In Globalization 3.0, you are going to see every color of the human rainbow take part.
Is the text of the description a quotation or a paraphrase of the source? quotation
Was the source of the description in print? If so, insert the source here.
Or was the source of the description online? If so, insert the source here. Friedman, Thomas L., “It's a Flat World, After All,” New York Times, April 3, 2005, accessed July 6, 2018, https://www.nytimes.com/2005/04/03/magazine/its-a-flat-world-after-all.html
Century CE or BCE of origin, manner, or change of usage 21 CE
Years CE or BCE of relevance 1492 CE, 1800 CE, 2000 CE, 2005 CE
Geographic area
Related languages
Related terms and phrases globalization, size, large, medium, dynamic, force, resource, imperial, conquest, imperial conquest, small, spearhead, market, labor, tiny, playing field, unique, character, globalize, competition, opportunity, collaborate, global, era, shrink, flatten, flat, world, empower, drive, European, American, company, country, diverse, Western, white, non-, nonwhite, individual, color, human, rainbow
Related symbols, icons, designs, and works of art
Related individuals
Related organizations
Related books
Related websites and blogs
Related articles, blog entries, editorials, essays, graphics, interviews, and other content
Related periodicals, newsletters, journals, and similar publications
Related events
Related constitutions, treaties, conventions, statutes, legislation, judicial decisions, regulations, proclamations, or other sources or enactments of law
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Connections to this term or phrase

The following pages have some connection to "globalization": Globalization (English, noun).

The following pages include "globalization" as an antecedent term or phrase: .

The following pages include "globalization" as a synonym: .

The following pages include "globalization" as an antonym: .

The following pages include "globalization" as a homonym: .

The following pages include "globalization" as a transcription or transliteration: .

The following pages include "globalization" as a translation equivalent: .

The following pages include "globalization" as a cognate: .

The following pages include "globalization" as a false friend: .

The following pages include "globalization" as a superior category in an ontological or taxonomic relationship: .

The following pages include "globalization" as an inferior category in an ontological or taxonomic relationship: .

The following pages have some connection to "globalisation": .

The following pages include "globalisation" as an antecedent term or phrase: .

The following pages include "globalisation" as a synonym: .

The following pages include "globalisation" as an antonym: .

The following pages include "globalisation" as a homonym: .

The following pages include "globalisation" as a transcription or transliteration: .

The following pages include "globalisation" as a translation equivalent: .

The following pages include "globalisation" as a cognate: .

The following pages include "globalisation" as a false friend: .

The following pages include "globalisation" as a superior category in an ontological or taxonomic relationship: .

The following pages include "globalisation" as an inferior category in an ontological or taxonomic relationship: .

20 CE +  and 21 CE +
emerge +, widespread +, currency +, existence +, apply +, history +, world +, prehistoric +, man +, earth +, bourgeois +, gentilhomme +, bourgeois gentilhomme +, prose +, spread +, computer +, satellite +, interconnectivity +, interdependency +, homo sapien +, un- +, parallel +, unparalleled +, time +, space +, compress +, unprecendented +, common +, parlance +, common parlance +, term +, assumption +, desirable +, desirability +, efficiency +, process +, global +, communication +, travel +, homogenize +, homogenization +, harmonize +, harmonization +, integrate +, integration +, recourse +, pattern +, business +, match +, tempt +, conflict +, uniform +, moral +, standard +, human +, right +, human rights +, plurality +, universal +, uniformization +, rule +, language +, culture +, law +, globalization +, size +, large +, medium +, dynamic +, force +, resource +, imperial +, conquest +, imperial conquest +, small +, spearhead +, market +, labor +, tiny +, playing field +, unique +, character +, globalize +, competition +, opportunity +, collaborate +, era +, shrink +, flatten +, flat +, empower +, drive +, European +, American +, company +, country +, diverse +, Western +, white +, non- +, nonwhite +, individual +, color +  and rainbow +
Globalization is primarily a post-World WaGlobalization is primarily a post-World War II development. The term “globalization” emerged sometime during the 1950s and gained widespread currency thereafter. Once in existence, it could then be applied to the history of the world before World War II. Of course, in one sense, globalization is very old. Prehistoric man roamed across the Earth. It is as if we suddenly realized, like Moliere’s bourgeois gentilhomme, that we were speaking prose all along. But the globalization I’m thinking about here is different. After World War II, with the coming and spread of computers and satellites, the interconnectivity and interdependency of Homo sapiens was unparalleled. Time and space were compressed in unprecedented ways.ace were compressed in unprecedented ways. +, In common parlance, the term ["globalisatiIn common parlance, the term ["globalisation"] creates assumptions about the desirability of increased efficiency in processes of global communication. We immediately think of easier travel, homogenisation of trade laws and hamonisation or integration of all kinds of rules, easing communication processes by recourse to one language, one pattern of doing business, and so on. This is matched by the tempting assumption that there would be less conflict if only all humans thought alike, followed uniform moral standards and respected universal human rights. However, is this realistic in view of universal plurality? Much universalised thinking about globalisation goes too far in its uncritical acceptance of the advantages of uniformisation. It is rather unreal to expect that the whole world would ever follow one rule system, one language and culture, or one law.tem, one language and culture, or one law. +  and Globalization 1.0 (1492 to 1800) shrank thGlobalization 1.0 (1492 to 1800) shrank the world from a size large to a size medium, and the dynamic force in that era was countries globalizing for resources and imperial conquest. Globalization 2.0 (1800 to 2000) shrank the world from a size medium to a size small, and it was spearheaded by companies globalizing for markets and labor. Globalization 3.0 (which started around 2000) is shrinking the world from a size small to a size tiny and flattening the playing field at the same time. And while the dynamic force in Globalization 1.0 was countries globalizing and the dynamic force in Globalization 2.0 was companies globalizing, the dynamic force in Globalization 3.0 — the thing that gives it its unique character — is individuals and small groups globalizing. Individuals must, and can, now ask: where do I fit into the global competition and opportunities of the day, and how can I, on my own, collaborate with others globally? But Globalization 3.0 not only differs from the previous eras in how it is shrinking and flattening the world and in how it is empowering individuals. It is also different in that Globalization 1.0 and 2.0 were driven primarily by European and American companies and countries. But going forward, this will be less and less true. Globalization 3.0 is not only going to be driven more by individuals but also by a much more diverse — non-Western, nonwhite — group of individuals. In Globalization 3.0, you are going to see every color of the human rainbow take part.very color of the human rainbow take part. +
Mazlish, Bruce, “Ruptures in History,” Historically Speaking, Vol. 12, No. 3 (June 2011), 32 +  and Menski, Werner, Comparative Law in a Global Context: The Legal Systems of Asia and Africa, 2nd ed. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009), 3 +
"British & World English: Globalization," Oxforddictionaries.com, accessed June 5, 2016, http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/globalization +  and Friedman, Thomas L., “It's a Flat World, After All,” New York Times, April 3, 2005, accessed July 6, 2018, https://www.nytimes.com/2005/04/03/magazine/its-a-flat-world-after-all.html +
1950 CE +, 1492 CE +, 1800 CE +, 2000 CE +  and 2005 CE +
globalization +  and globalisation +