-ment (English, suffix)

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Term or phrase -ment
Language English
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Function in sentence or vocabulary suffix
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Description of origin, manner, or change of usage The Latin and French endings were originally added to verbs. Two words based on Latin verbs are ornament (Latin ornare, adorn) and testament (Latin testamentum, a will, from testari, to testify). Two based on French verbs are appeasement (Old French apaisier, from pais, peace), and encouragement (French encourager based on corage, courage).

English has usually followed suit by adding the ending to verbs. Many nouns ending in -ment indicate either the result of an action or the process involved.

Is the text of the description a quotation or a paraphrase of the source? quotation
Was the source of the description in print? If so, insert the source here. Quinion, Michael, Ologies and Isms: A Dictionary of Word Beginnings and Endings (New York: Oxford University Press, 2005), s.v. “-ment"
Or was the source of the description online? If so, insert the source here.
Century CE or BCE of origin, manner, or change of usage
Years CE or BCE of relevance
Geographic area
Related languages Latin, French, Old French, English
Related terms and phrases ending, add, verb, word, ornament, ornare, adorn, testament, testamentum, will, testari, testify, appeasement, apaisier, pais, peace, encouragement, encourager, corage, courage, follow suit, result, action, process, involve
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Antecedent term or phrase -mentum
Antecedent language Latin
If an appropriate language is not listed, please suggest one
Sources of information in print Quinion, Michael, Ologies and Isms: A Dictionary of Word Beginnings and Endings (New York: Oxford University Press, 2005), s.v. “-ment"
Sources of information online
Antecedent term or phrase -ment
Antecedent language French
If an appropriate language is not listed, please suggest one
Sources of information in print Quinion, Michael, Ologies and Isms: A Dictionary of Word Beginnings and Endings (New York: Oxford University Press, 2005), s.v. “-ment"
Sources of information online

Connections to this term or phrase

The following pages have some connection to "-ment": Amendment (English, noun).

The following pages include "-ment" as an antecedent term or phrase: -ment (English, suffix).

The following pages include "-ment" as a synonym: .

The following pages include "-ment" as an antonym: .

The following pages include "-ment" as a homonym: .

The following pages include "-ment" as a transcription or transliteration: .

The following pages include "-ment" as a translation equivalent: .

The following pages include "-ment" as a cognate: .

The following pages include "-ment" as a false friend: .

The following pages include "-ment" as a superior category in an ontological or taxonomic relationship: .

The following pages include "-ment" as an inferior category in an ontological or taxonomic relationship: .

... more about "-ment (English, suffix)"
Latin +  and French +
-mentum +  and -ment +
Latin +, French +, Old French +  and English +
ending +, add +, verb +, word +, ornament +, ornare +, adorn +, testament +, testamentum +, will +, testari +, testify +, appeasement +, apaisier +, pais +, peace +, encouragement +, encourager +, corage +, courage +, follow suit +, result +, action +, process +  and involve +
The Latin and French endings were originalThe Latin and French endings were originally added to verbs. Two words based on Latin verbs are ornament (Latin ornare, adorn) and testament (Latin testamentum, a will, from testari, to testify). Two based on French verbs are appeasement (Old French apaisier, from pais, peace), and encouragement (French encourager based on corage, courage). English has usually followed suit by adding the ending to verbs. Many nouns ending in -ment indicate either the result of an action or the process involved.sult of an action or the process involved. +
Quinion, Michael, Ologies and Isms: A Dictionary of Word Beginnings and Endings (New York: Oxford University Press, 2005), s.v. “-ment" +